Greater London Wildfowl Project

Greater London Wildfowl Project

Shovelers, gadwalls and teal (c) Bertie Gregory/2020VISION

This project aims to increase our understanding of how waterfowl use water bodies in Greater London; with particular focus on gadwall and shoveler.

Through radio-tracking and ringing, the project will monitor the movements of gadwall and shoveler as they move between water bodies in the Greater London area.

The project will look at how gadwall and shoveler use water bodies to fulfill their requirements for roosting and foraging. The project will help to identify which water bodies are most important for gadwall and shoveler and inform recommendations for their conservation management.

This project is a partnership between Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust, Environment Agency, Lee Valley Regional Park Authority and Thames Water.

Project focus species

Gadwall

Gadwall (c) Josh Kubale

Gadwall

Gadwall are present year-round in the UK in small numbers but the number of birds increases dramatically in winter when an influx of continental birds from further north joins their UK cousins. UK wintering numbers are estimated to be 25,000 birds. Gadwall are protected by The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and have an amber conservation status meaning that they are deemed to be at risk. 

Learn more about gadwall
Shoveler

Shoveler (c)David Tipling/2020VISION

Shoveler

Shovelers are surface feeing ducks with large bills. Shovelers are native to the UK where they breed in southern and eastern England. In winter, breeding birds move south, and are replaced by an influx of continental birds from further north. UK wintering numbers are estimated to be 18,000 birds. Shovelers are protected by The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and have an amber conservation status meaning that they are deemed to be at risk. 

Learn more about shovelers

Update - December 2018

Four gadwall were fitted with GPS trackers on 30th November. The monitoring group are aiming to take between 12 and 24 data points a day, depending on the batteries of the GPS trackers. The cloudy weather at the start of December means that the team need to take extra care of the GPS tracker batteries as their solar panels will not be providing much power. Keep checking back here for more information as we continue to track the bird's movements. 

Project pilot gallery

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